Last edited by Kazill
Tuesday, July 21, 2020 | History

2 edition of Loyalist imprints printed in America, 1774-1785 found in the catalog.

Loyalist imprints printed in America, 1774-1785

James E. Mooney

Loyalist imprints printed in America, 1774-1785

by James E. Mooney

  • 46 Want to read
  • 11 Currently reading

Published by American Antiquarian Society in Worcester, Mass .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • United States -- History -- Revolution, 1775-1783 -- Bibliography.,
  • United States -- Politics and government -- 1775-1783 -- Bibliography.

  • Edition Notes

    StatementJames E. Mooney.
    ContributionsAmerican Antiquarian Society.
    The Physical Object
    Pagination105-218 p. ;
    Number of Pages218
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL14541399M

      The Declaration of Dependence signed by New York City Loyalists in November was not the only such declaration written and signed by loyal inhabitants of the colony of New York soon after British military forces established their presence in the region. At least three others are known to exist, bearing a total of 3, signatures of individuals willing to pledge their support of, and. "Loyalist Imprints Printed in America, [annotated list]," by James E. Mooney. Proceedings of the American Philosophical Society, (Sept. 13, ): "John Quincy Adams's German Library, with a Catalog of His German Books," by Walter J. Morris.

      Making the Revolution: America, In the mid s, especially after the Battle of Lexington and Concord in April , any toleration for Loyalists vanished. Patriot committees of safety required citizens to pledge support for the cause of American independence or be deemed “inimical to the liberties of America.”. What is a Loyalist? For our purposes, we define a Loyalist as any inhabitant of North America, from Newfoundland to Nicaragua inclusive, plus the islands of the West Indies, Bermuda and Jamaica, who served in a military capacity for the British, or provided services of a military nature or other beneficial services to the Crown.

    "This book is the first comprehensive modern account of what happened to the loyalists in the American Revolution. In colonial society of 2, , , the loyalists numbered approximately , Nearly one-fifth of the population, therefore, held allegiance to the British Crown. This Library of America series edition is printed on acid-free paper and features Smyth-sewn binding, a full cloth cover, and a ribbon marker. The American Revolution: Writings from the War of Independence is kept in print by a gift from Mary Carr Patton to the Guardians of American Letters Fund, made in memory of her father, James J. Patton.


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Loyalist imprints printed in America, 1774-1785 by James E. Mooney Download PDF EPUB FB2

Loyalist Imprints, Printed in America, Paperback – January 1, by James E. Mooney (Author) See all formats and editions Hide other formats and editionsAuthor: James E. Mooney. Loyalist Imprints Printed in America, JAMES E. MOONEY PROGRAM FOR LOYALIST STUDIES AND PUBLICATIONS Sponsored by the American Antiquarian Society City University of New Tork University of London and University of New Brunswick ROBERT A.

EAST, Executive Director Volume eighty-two of the Proceedings of the American Anti. Get this from a library. Loyalist imprints printed in America, [James E Mooney; American Antiquarian Society.].

Stanford Libraries' official online search tool for books, media, journals, databases, government documents and more. Loyalist imprints printed in America, in SearchWorks catalog Skip to search Skip to main content. : Loyalists in East Florida The Most Important Documents Pertaining Thereto (The American Revolutionary series.

The Loyalist library) (): Siebert, Henry: Books. Mooney, James E. Loyalist Imprints Printed in America, P.E.I. Genealogical Society. Kings County cemeteries, Prince Edward Island: index of monumental (headstone) inscriptions. A Checklist of American Imprints for by Carol Rinderknecht, Scott Bruntjen and a great selection of related books, 1774-1785 book and collectibles available now at Passion for Loyalist Imprints, Printed in America, Mooney, James E.

BOOK - Kingston and the "Loyalists of the Spring Fleet" of By Walter Bates 1774-1785 book published by Barnes and Company, Saint John, This edition by Global Heritage Press, Milton, This book deals with the exodus of the Loyalists of the Spring Fleet from the. C.C.

Little and J. Brown, - American loyalists - pages 0 Reviews Biographical notices of Loyalists, men in America who separate themselves from their friends and kindred, who are driven from their homes, who surrender the hopes and expectations of life.

These books contain alphabetical lists of loyalists with dates and places of service, regiments, land holdings, and brief information on their lives and families. FHL book H2u or film item 2.

The Centennial of the Settlement of Upper Canada by the United Empire Loyalists, United Empire Loyalist Centennial Committee. Jim Piecuch, Three Peoples, One King: Loyalists, Indians, and Slaves in the Revolutionary South (Columbia: University of South Carolina Press, ), Chapters 2 and 3.

Robert S. Lambert, South Carolina Loyalists in the American Revolution (Columbia, University of South Carolina Press, ), Harry M. Ward, Between the Lines: Banditti of the American Revolution.

Loyalist imprints printed in America, EM81 L8 Guide to the Materials in London Archives for the History of the United States since EP In North America, the term loyalist characterised colonists who rejected the American Revolution in favour of remaining within the British an loyalists included royal officials, Anglican clergymen, wealthy merchants with ties to London, demobilised British soldiers, and recent arrivals (especially from Scotland), as well as many ordinary colonists who were conservative by nature.

'A Bibliography of Loyalist Source Material in Canada,' Proceedings of the American Antiquarian Society 82(); Timothy M. Barnes, 'Loyalist Newspapers of the American Revolution S A Bibliography,' ibid., 83()O; and James E.

Mooney, 'Loyalist Imprints Printed in America, ," ibid., 84(): American Revolution, –83, struggle by which the Thirteen Colonies on the Atlantic seaboard of North America won independence from Great Britain and became the United States.

It is also called the American War of Independence. Causes and Early Troubles By the middle of the 18th cent., differences in life, thought, and interests had developed between the mother country and the growing. Loyalist Literature, an Annotated Bibliographic Guide to the Writings on the Loyalists of the American Revolution.

Main Z A Loyalist Imprints Printed in America, Main Z M Reader's Guide to American History. Main E R43 Loyalists were American colonists who stayed loyal to the British Crown during the American Revolutionary War, often called Tories, Royalists, or King's Men at the time.

They were opposed by the Patriots, who supported the revolution, and called them "persons inimical to the liberties of America". Prominent Loyalists repeatedly assured the British government that many thousands of them would.

Duke holds one of the world’s largest collections of Confederate imprints, or items printed in the Confederate States of America between secession from the Union and the surrender of the Confederate military forces (December April ).

Confederate imprints are notable for their fragility. Loyalists were American colonists who remained loyal to the British Empire and the British monarchy during the American Revolutionary the time they were often called Tories, Royalists, or King's Men; Patriots called them, "persons inimical to the liberties of America." [1] They were opposed by the Patriots, those who supported the their cause was defeated, about 15% of.

In andsome fifty thousand Americans felt that they could not support the revolution against Britain. They were called Loyalists – and there would be no place for them in the new United they streamed into the Canadian colonies to the north, they changed forever the face of settlement there.

Their arrival would eventually lead to the formation of the provinces of New 3/5(1). Writing the History of the American West by Martin Ridge and a great selection of related books, art and collectibles available now at American Antiquarian Society - AbeBooks Passion for books.Colonial USA: Loyalists Genealogy & history books.

Everyday discount prices and great customer service. Search + Genealogy books, CDs, and maps.appendices, one containing a list by colony of American Loyalist newspa- pers,and the second, an alphabetical list by author and title of Loyalist imprints in America, The index is keyed to repository.